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The ECCN Blog

Ranching in a Warming World – How climate change will affect cattle production in the U.S. Great Plains (and some solutions)

OCT. 22, 2020 by TONI KLEMM The U.S. Great Plains, the vast agricultural flatlands between the Mississippi River and the Rocky Mountains, are renowned for producing most of the country’s corn, wheat, and soybeans. But they are also home to 16 million beef cows, half of the U.S. beef herd. Ranching is part of the … Continue reading Ranching in a Warming World – How climate change will affect cattle production in the U.S. Great Plains (and some solutions)

Getting the Most Bang For Your Conservation Buck

OCT. 15, 2020 by TINA MOZELEWSKI Editor’s Note: This is a guest post from Tina Mozelewski, a Ph.D. student in North Carolina State University’s (NCSU) Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources and 2018-2019 Southeast Climate Adaptation Science Center Global Change Research Fellow. This blog is reposted with permission from the Climate Impacts Blog hosted by … Continue reading Getting the Most Bang For Your Conservation Buck

Recording Science at Home

OCT. 8, 2020 by ADRIENNE WOOTTEN Let’s face it, the current pandemic has changed a lot for how most scientists work. We’re teleworking more than before, doing webinars, and having virtual meetings in place of in-person meetings. One thing I do frequently is climate modeling 101 presentations and webinars. Back in June, I was asked … Continue reading Recording Science at Home

The Sun Rises on a New Day

SEP. 16, 2020 THE EDITORIAL BOARD [ADRIENNE WOOTTEN, MEAGHAN GUCKIAN, CLAY TUCKER, TONI KLEMM, LINDSEY MIDDLETON, CAIT ROTTLER] Have you ever been awake to see the sun as it rises? Have you been there, waiting in the dark as that first bit of light cracks across the horizon? Did you plan to be there for … Continue reading The Sun Rises on a New Day

The Future is Waiting, Just Around the Riverbend

DEC. 13, 2018 THE EDITORIAL BOARD [MICHELLE STAUDINGER, ADRIENNE WOOTTEN, MEAGHAN GUCKIAN, EZRA MARKOWITZ, CLAY TUCKER, ELSITA KIEKEBUSCH, TONI KLEMM, LINDSEY MIDDLETON, CAIT ROTTLER] In 2012, a group of bright- eyed students and post-docs gathered at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest in Blue River, Oregon, to learn about climate change, climate adaptation, and science communication. … Continue reading The Future is Waiting, Just Around the Riverbend

Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center Fellows Retreat

JUN 18, 2018     JAMIE MOSEL As a first year PhD student, being a part of the Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center is a spectacular learning opportunity. Each month, I’m able to participate in meetings and seminars, to learn about the work of other researchers and students, and to improve my own research and engagement. Being a … Continue reading Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center Fellows Retreat

Visualizing uncertainty

JUN 4, 2018     ELSITA KIEKEBUSCH “Science is so, so visual!” – Neil McCoy Many of us in the early-career phase have trained long and hard in the skills necessary to “do science”.  We’ve practiced experimental design, statistical analysis, and manuscript writing. But we haven’t been formally trained to communicate our science outside of our field to … Continue reading Visualizing uncertainty

Playing Tug-of-War

APR 16, 2018 – ADRIENNE WOOTTEN Do you recall playing a little game called tug-of-war as a child (or even as an adult)? If you were playing with one other person, you’d stand on one side, they’d stand on the other, with a rope held between you. You and your friend (or foe) would start … Continue reading Playing Tug-of-War

Finding mentors and making it work long-distance: Perspectives from an NSF GRIP Intern

MAR 27, 2018     DEIDRE JAEGER Today my colleague asked me, “are you going to test these sensors on a tree up in the mountains so you can go somewhere out-of-town?” My response was, “Nope, I’m putting them on trees at campus and at my house.” This colleague, an engineer who works in the basement of our … Continue reading Finding mentors and making it work long-distance: Perspectives from an NSF GRIP Intern

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