Ranching in a Warming World – How climate change will affect cattle production in the U.S. Great Plains (and some solutions)

OCT. 22, 2020 by TONI KLEMM All photos: Toni Klemm The U.S. Great Plains, the vast agricultural flatlands between the Mississippi River and the Rocky Mountains, are renowned for producing most of the country’s corn, wheat, and soybeans. But they are also home to 16 million beef cows, half of the U.S. beef herd. Ranching … Continue reading Ranching in a Warming World – How climate change will affect cattle production in the U.S. Great Plains (and some solutions)

Reef temperature wrangler

OCT 16, 2017     BRANDON ARAUJO Photo: wildcoast.net Coral reefs often go unnoticed because they’re underwater; but even though we don’t regularly pay much attention to them, they’re an extremely important part of our everyday lives. Coral reefs have been estimated to provide support for over a quarter of all marine species and this extreme biodiversity makes … Continue reading Reef temperature wrangler

Climate change and infrastructure impacts

OCT 2, 2017     ETHAN COFFEL Photo: Toni Klemm Our infrastructure is designed for the climate in which it was developed; engineering standards and logistical procedures are based on historical weather patterns, and as environmental conditions change, some of these systems may need to be re-configured. In aviation, aircraft takeoff performance depends on temperature. This is because … Continue reading Climate change and infrastructure impacts

Lessons from an early-career social scientist

MAY 15, 2017     TYLER BEETON My interest in understanding the biological, cultural, and historical context of the human experience started at a very young age, and continues to this day. I am an environmental anthropologist, and currently an NC CSC fellow and PhD student in Ecology at Colorado State University. My training has been broad, and … Continue reading Lessons from an early-career social scientist

Analyzing and Communicating Extreme Climate Risk

APR 17, 2017    by CLAY TUCKER High water road closure. Photo: C. Tucker Public opinion and scientific consensus are not always on the same page. For example, the theory of heliocentrism (the Earth revolving around the Sun) was first proposed by Greek theorists 2,500 years ago and later confirmed by Nicolaus Copernicus, Johannes Kepler, Galileo Galilei, and Isaac … Continue reading Analyzing and Communicating Extreme Climate Risk