Visualizing uncertainty

JUN 4, 2018     ELSITA KIEKEBUSCH Photo: Elsita Kiekebusch “Science is so, so visual!” – Neil McCoy Many of us in the early-career phase have trained long and hard in the skills necessary to “do science”.  We’ve practiced experimental design, statistical analysis, and manuscript writing. But we haven’t been formally trained to communicate our science outside of … Continue reading Visualizing uncertainty

Using Climate Projections in the (Almost) Real World

SEP 5, 2017     ADRIENNE WOOTTEN AND JESSICA BLACKBAND In recent years, numerous climate projections (such as MACA or LOCA) have been made available for use in impact assessments and adaptation planning. However, the breadth of available projections presents a daunting challenge to managers and scientists who are trying to determine which projections are appropriate for a particular decision context. … Continue reading Using Climate Projections in the (Almost) Real World

Notes from the Field: An Educational Swamp Tour

Students listen to Dean Stacie Haynie (standing) of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences discuss possibilities at LSU. JUL 31, 2017     CLAY TUCKER For three weeks every summer, undergraduate students from the South Central United States, representing a wide range of cultural backgrounds participate in the “Undergraduate Summer Internship for Underrepresented Minorities” program to visit … Continue reading Notes from the Field: An Educational Swamp Tour

Talking climate change to middle-schoolers

JUN 26, 2017    by TONI KLEMM 7th-graders learning about climate change. Photo: Toni Klemm We’ve all heard the phrase that science should be explained on the level of sixth- to eighth-graders to be understandable for a general audience, right? But who has ever tried to explain science to actual sixth- to eighth-graders? I can now proudly say … Continue reading Talking climate change to middle-schoolers

Lessons from an early-career social scientist

MAY 15, 2017     TYLER BEETON My interest in understanding the biological, cultural, and historical context of the human experience started at a very young age, and continues to this day. I am an environmental anthropologist, and currently an NC CSC fellow and PhD student in Ecology at Colorado State University. My training has been broad, and … Continue reading Lessons from an early-career social scientist

Analyzing and Communicating Extreme Climate Risk

APR 17, 2017    by CLAY TUCKER High water road closure. Photo: C. Tucker Public opinion and scientific consensus are not always on the same page. For example, the theory of heliocentrism (the Earth revolving around the Sun) was first proposed by Greek theorists 2,500 years ago and later confirmed by Nicolaus Copernicus, Johannes Kepler, Galileo Galilei, and Isaac … Continue reading Analyzing and Communicating Extreme Climate Risk

Out of the Lab and Into the Light, Why Scientists are Marching

MAR 20, 2017     GIL OUELLETTE Photo credit: Bryan Francis (March for Science) “Science” is a word that means many things to many people. If you were to ask a practicing scientist how they define science, you might receive one of myriad responses. How each of us conceptualizes science may be unique, but most scientists recognize a … Continue reading Out of the Lab and Into the Light, Why Scientists are Marching

Communicating your research – A mental obstacle course

AUG 29, 2016     TONI LYN MORELLI I recently had an experience that felt like the mental equivalent of a hot, muddy, exhausting, physically scarring, and obstacle-filled endurance Bone Frog Challenge race that I ran a couple years ago. Only this time I was comfortably seated in an auditorium. Toni Lyn with Paula Poundstone. I was at … Continue reading Communicating your research – A mental obstacle course