Ranching in a Warming World – How climate change will affect cattle production in the U.S. Great Plains (and some solutions)

OCT. 22, 2020 by TONI KLEMM All photos: Toni Klemm The U.S. Great Plains, the vast agricultural flatlands between the Mississippi River and the Rocky Mountains, are renowned for producing most of the country’s corn, wheat, and soybeans. But they are also home to 16 million beef cows, half of the U.S. beef herd. Ranching … Continue reading Ranching in a Warming World – How climate change will affect cattle production in the U.S. Great Plains (and some solutions)

Getting the Most Bang For Your Conservation Buck

OCT. 15, 2020 by TINA MOZELEWSKI Editor's Note: This is a guest post from Tina Mozelewski, a Ph.D. student in North Carolina State University's (NCSU) Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources and 2018-2019 Southeast Climate Adaptation Science Center Global Change Research Fellow. This blog is reposted with permission from the Climate Impacts Blog hosted by … Continue reading Getting the Most Bang For Your Conservation Buck

Talking climate change to middle-schoolers

JUN 26, 2017    by TONI KLEMM 7th-graders learning about climate change. Photo: Toni Klemm We’ve all heard the phrase that science should be explained on the level of sixth- to eighth-graders to be understandable for a general audience, right? But who has ever tried to explain science to actual sixth- to eighth-graders? I can now proudly say … Continue reading Talking climate change to middle-schoolers

Analyzing and Communicating Extreme Climate Risk

APR 17, 2017    by CLAY TUCKER High water road closure. Photo: C. Tucker Public opinion and scientific consensus are not always on the same page. For example, the theory of heliocentrism (the Earth revolving around the Sun) was first proposed by Greek theorists 2,500 years ago and later confirmed by Nicolaus Copernicus, Johannes Kepler, Galileo Galilei, and Isaac … Continue reading Analyzing and Communicating Extreme Climate Risk

The Inside Story: Highlights and perspectives from the first ever National CSC Early Career Training

DEC 11, 2016     TONI KLEMM On November 2nd and 3rd, the first ever National CSC Early Career Training was held at UMass Amherst. Over 2-days, students from across the U.S. heard about peer reserach ranging from butterflies in North Carolina, paleoclimatology along the Gulf Coast, to how wild berries are impacted by fire regimes in Alaska, … Continue reading The Inside Story: Highlights and perspectives from the first ever National CSC Early Career Training

Climate Science in the Trump Years

DEC 5, 2016     ETHAN COFFEL Most early career climate scientists, myself included, entered the field during the years of the Obama Administration. Climate science was officially respected and encouraged, and we saw the U.S. take a leading role in negotiating the Paris Accord and back up its talk by substantially reducing its greenhouse gas emissions. These policies are … Continue reading Climate Science in the Trump Years