The Complex World of Drought Management on Ranches

OCT 30, 2017     TONI KLEMM Photo: Toni Klemm For the last two years I have been studying decision making in winter wheat farming in the Southern Great Plains. I want to help forecasters provide seasonal climate forecasts that do a better job of warning farmers of upcoming bad conditions, such as drought, extreme rainfall, or heat. … Continue reading The Complex World of Drought Management on Ranches

Reef temperature wrangler

OCT 16, 2017     BRANDON ARAUJO Photo: wildcoast.net Coral reefs often go unnoticed because they’re underwater; but even though we don’t regularly pay much attention to them, they’re an extremely important part of our everyday lives. Coral reefs have been estimated to provide support for over a quarter of all marine species and this extreme biodiversity makes … Continue reading Reef temperature wrangler

Climate change and infrastructure impacts

OCT 2, 2017     ETHAN COFFEL Photo: Toni Klemm Our infrastructure is designed for the climate in which it was developed; engineering standards and logistical procedures are based on historical weather patterns, and as environmental conditions change, some of these systems may need to be re-configured. In aviation, aircraft takeoff performance depends on temperature. This is because … Continue reading Climate change and infrastructure impacts

Studying Berries in Bear Country

AUG 14, 2017     LINDSEY PARKINSON Photo: http://www.arkive.org/american-black-bear/ursus-americanus/ Summer ‘tis the season of studies from geology to ornithology and everything in between. I study wild berry species to try to find what environmental factors have the strongest influence on berry productivity. With no other wild fruits in Alaska, berries are an important natural and cultural resource, one that … Continue reading Studying Berries in Bear Country

Notes from the Field: An Educational Swamp Tour

Students listen to Dean Stacie Haynie (standing) of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences discuss possibilities at LSU. JUL 31, 2017     CLAY TUCKER For three weeks every summer, undergraduate students from the South Central United States, representing a wide range of cultural backgrounds participate in the “Undergraduate Summer Internship for Underrepresented Minorities” program to visit … Continue reading Notes from the Field: An Educational Swamp Tour

Notes from the field: Summer Undergraduate Internship on Maine Coastal Islands National Wildlife Refuge

JUL 24, 2017     RACHEL BRATTON A newly hatched Guillemot chick about to be measured and weighed (pre-manicure!). Photo: R. Bratton. This summer, I spent two weeks on a seabird research island as part of my internship with the Northeast Climate Science Center, Five College Coastal & Marine Sciences Program, and Audubon Project Puffin. Project Puffin, based out of Bremen, … Continue reading Notes from the field: Summer Undergraduate Internship on Maine Coastal Islands National Wildlife Refuge

Lessons from an early-career social scientist

MAY 15, 2017     TYLER BEETON My interest in understanding the biological, cultural, and historical context of the human experience started at a very young age, and continues to this day. I am an environmental anthropologist, and currently an NC CSC fellow and PhD student in Ecology at Colorado State University. My training has been broad, and … Continue reading Lessons from an early-career social scientist

Analyzing and Communicating Extreme Climate Risk

APR 17, 2017    by CLAY TUCKER High water road closure. Photo: C. Tucker Public opinion and scientific consensus are not always on the same page. For example, the theory of heliocentrism (the Earth revolving around the Sun) was first proposed by Greek theorists 2,500 years ago and later confirmed by Nicolaus Copernicus, Johannes Kepler, Galileo Galilei, and Isaac … Continue reading Analyzing and Communicating Extreme Climate Risk